Our Successes · Access to Justice

Free advice line helps thousands across State

30 November, 2014

Over the past 25 years, EDO Qld has provided free legal support to communities via our FREE advice line. Landholders, individuals and community groups now better understand and act on their legal rights, which means we are better protected against the impacts of major coal mines and massive coastal developments.

Did you know you can phone us to request free initial legal advice on an environmental or planning law matter in the public interest?

Each year, EDO Qld provides free legal information and advice to hundreds of individuals, community groups and conservation groups seeking to protect the environment in the public interest, including many from rural and regional Queensland.

We give expert advice to anyone in the community looking to protect the environment in the public interest via our community legal advice line.

Volunteer lawyers answer queries that spread across local, state and national laws, and have helped on a number of issues relating to:

  • planning and development processes

  • vegetation clearing

  • pollution incidents

  • wildlife management

  • advice on making submissions on developments, and

  • support for potential litigants.

Sometimes it’s as simple as directing a person to the right place to register a complaint about illegal activity; sometimes detailed legal research on pollution law or water law for example might be needed for that client.

No matter what, EDO Qld is there to help the community protect the environment in the public interest.

“It is a sobering thought, that stage one of this environmental disaster would be operating now had this group not been able to rely on your resources. I had no idea what to expect, I’d never even seen the inside of a court room. If we hadn’t found EDO, we couldn’t have done it. The courts are a foreign place and speak a foreign language. We weren’t prepared the first time, but this time we are armed with the knowledge we need to prove to the developers and council that a development of this nature, in this location is flawed.”

John Greacen, grazier
Successfully appealed against a feedlot on the Condamine River